1. Carnival Q&A
At the carnival some of us second years got the chance to ask Director Chris Gaffey and Tom Davies from K2L some questions. The focus was mainly on creating a perfect portfolio and getting/keeping a job. Before Chris came in and took over the discussion Tom explained how a printed portfolio should be specific to the job you apply for. Rather than putting everything in and hoping for the best, less is often more. Chris said an online portfolio was essential as a first showcase of your talent, then he would do a few face to face meetings to determine whether your personality is right for the job.

Talent + Effort + Personality

It’s important to have an interest in all areas of design because a project which shows you’ve explored varied applications of a simple idea will get you further.

Find a niche your good at and transform it in to worth

His favourite job was with Alton Towers in the 90’s when he created all the branding and advertising for Oblivion.
Image by Mike Warren

    Carnival Q&A

    At the carnival some of us second years got the chance to ask Director Chris Gaffey and Tom Davies from K2L some questions. The focus was mainly on creating a perfect portfolio and getting/keeping a job. Before Chris came in and took over the discussion Tom explained how a printed portfolio should be specific to the job you apply for. Rather than putting everything in and hoping for the best, less is often more. Chris said an online portfolio was essential as a first showcase of your talent, then he would do a few face to face meetings to determine whether your personality is right for the job.

    Talent + Effort + Personality

    It’s important to have an interest in all areas of design because a project which shows you’ve explored varied applications of a simple idea will get you further.

    Find a niche your good at and transform it in to worth

    His favourite job was with Alton Towers in the 90’s when he created all the branding and advertising for Oblivion.

    Image by Mike Warren

  2. Guest Lecture- Ross Anderson

    Previously working as Video Commissioner and recent Creative Director of Polydor Records, he was responsible for genre defining music video campaigns for countless platinum selling artists, including Take That, Cheryl Cole, Klaxons, White Lies, Duffy and Enrique Iglesias amongst many others.

    He talked about the difficulties of working with such a small budget and the introduction of product placement and sponsors in music videos. Music videos are becoming more and more accessible via youtube and itunes not just through TV. Also the question of viral videos came up- Can they be produced on demand or do they come about naturally using OKGO as an example.

    video: White Lies- Bigger Than Us

    (Source: niceandpolite.com)

  3. Yesterday Brian Cannon gave us graphic students a lecture on his work, centred around his iconic album art for the Verve and Oasis.
Art has been an inspiration since a young age, especially the art movements that stem from different music genres like punk rock and hip-hop. He admitted a lot of his work opportunities came by chance and luck as self-promotion wasn’t his thing. “If you maintain a high standard you will get continual work”.
Almost all of Brian’s album covers are non-digital and any photo effects are done manually in the darkroom. Before shooting with a band he would sketch out and take test shots of a scene to save time later. “Research and preparation are king”.
For the ‘Some Might Say’ cover Brian searched the country for a disused railway station and the final image uses his friends and family as models. He prefers it that way because hired models don’t have the same enthusiasm for the projects.
The Oasis logo was originally a mix of Adidas and Decca logos, but the type was later refined to be more legible.


I also found this interview with Computer Arts

    Yesterday Brian Cannon gave us graphic students a lecture on his work, centred around his iconic album art for the Verve and Oasis.

    Art has been an inspiration since a young age, especially the art movements that stem from different music genres like punk rock and hip-hop. He admitted a lot of his work opportunities came by chance and luck as self-promotion wasn’t his thing. “If you maintain a high standard you will get continual work”.

    Almost all of Brian’s album covers are non-digital and any photo effects are done manually in the darkroom. Before shooting with a band he would sketch out and take test shots of a scene to save time later. “Research and preparation are king”.

    For the ‘Some Might Say’ cover Brian searched the country for a disused railway station and the final image uses his friends and family as models. He prefers it that way because hired models don’t have the same enthusiasm for the projects.

    The Oasis logo was originally a mix of Adidas and Decca logos, but the type was later refined to be more legible.

    I also found this interview with Computer Arts

  4. OWT came in to give a lecture today on their work. I had heard of them beforehand, I follow them on twitter and have seen the zines in Magma a few times. I find zines very interesting and have collected a few over my time at university. I even made one for the Salford and Leeds zine fair last year which I enjoyed, but found the printing process to be very off-putting.
I find most zines to be very strange a bit like Conceptual art, where the meaning is not obvious and is open to interpretation. But that’s what makes them so interesting. I love the design process of creating a zine, it’s so free and experimental with hardly any restrictions. I like the tactility and overall style of zines, as OWT explained it would be hard to translate that in to digital versions.
The last zines I bought were No.Zine’s #4 #5 and #6. Each issue is centred around it’s number and uses 1 key colour. Each of OWT’s zines are based around a single topic/word and rely on artist submissions. They admitted it wasn’t bringing in loads of money but with each issue they put money back in to improve the format of the next one. To advertise they use the power of tweets and blogging, building friendships with shops like Magma and selling at print fairs.

    OWT came in to give a lecture today on their work. I had heard of them beforehand, I follow them on twitter and have seen the zines in Magma a few times. I find zines very interesting and have collected a few over my time at university. I even made one for the Salford and Leeds zine fair last year which I enjoyed, but found the printing process to be very off-putting.

    I find most zines to be very strange a bit like Conceptual art, where the meaning is not obvious and is open to interpretation. But that’s what makes them so interesting. I love the design process of creating a zine, it’s so free and experimental with hardly any restrictions. I like the tactility and overall style of zines, as OWT explained it would be hard to translate that in to digital versions.

    The last zines I bought were No.Zine’s #4 #5 and #6. Each issue is centred around it’s number and uses 1 key colour. Each of OWT’s zines are based around a single topic/word and rely on artist submissions. They admitted it wasn’t bringing in loads of money but with each issue they put money back in to improve the format of the next one. To advertise they use the power of tweets and blogging, building friendships with shops like Magma and selling at print fairs.

  5. > TASHATIME: OWT CREATIVE- TALK TOMORROW

    tashatime:

    HELLOOOO ALL SALFORD GRAPHICS…
    http://www.owtcreative.com/
    OWT ARE COMING IN TOMORROW 1.00 G18- they will be going over what OWT is and how you can get involved…. I will email info as well ALL WELCOME should be bout an hour- they want to do some workshops in the future and are ACE so come…

  6. At the end of Feb, Si Scott came in to give a talk on his designs and inspire us students. To be honest I didn’t know who he was to start with but I recognised some of his work I’d seen in magazines. He tries to stay away from the computer as much as possible and prefers to send personal packs of his work to potential clients rather than email a pdf. His work is all drawn by hand with with fine line pens (staedtler), the detail of his work is amazing but it doesn’t take him as long as you would imagine to do each piece.
Scott has worked for some big clients including Adidas, Coca Cola, O2, BBC, Nike and Selfridges. When he got the call from Coca Cola he didn’t like the company but wanted to make work for them because it’s seen as a cool thing to do and would boost his profile. He is in a lucky position to be able to turn down work from big names which he nearly did for a Madonna project because of them being too fussy. But you have to be aware of exactly how your work will be used as he found a design on a t-shirt which was never intended to be and wasn’t aware of.

I like his work but to me it all seems to look the same, particularly his typography work. But that’s what makes him original and unique and something clients seem to want. My favourites are the animal and airborne series, just because of the amount of detail and they look so realistic.
Recently he has started to look at other directions to take his work and enjoys working with people in a different field such as animation and paper modelling. He seemed to just enjoy being creative and making money from it is a bonus.

    At the end of Feb, Si Scott came in to give a talk on his designs and inspire us students. To be honest I didn’t know who he was to start with but I recognised some of his work I’d seen in magazines. He tries to stay away from the computer as much as possible and prefers to send personal packs of his work to potential clients rather than email a pdf. His work is all drawn by hand with with fine line pens (staedtler), the detail of his work is amazing but it doesn’t take him as long as you would imagine to do each piece.

    Scott has worked for some big clients including Adidas, Coca Cola, O2, BBC, Nike and Selfridges. When he got the call from Coca Cola he didn’t like the company but wanted to make work for them because it’s seen as a cool thing to do and would boost his profile. He is in a lucky position to be able to turn down work from big names which he nearly did for a Madonna project because of them being too fussy. But you have to be aware of exactly how your work will be used as he found a design on a t-shirt which was never intended to be and wasn’t aware of.

    I like his work but to me it all seems to look the same, particularly his typography work. But that’s what makes him original and unique and something clients seem to want. My favourites are the animal and airborne series, just because of the amount of detail and they look so realistic.

    Recently he has started to look at other directions to take his work and enjoys working with people in a different field such as animation and paper modelling. He seemed to just enjoy being creative and making money from it is a bonus.

  7. The book binding workshop with Hannah and Lucy today was quite inspiring. We made a pamphlet with newsprint, a beak book and concertina book. At the moment I’m thinking of doing a pamphlet or beak book but maybe bigger than A5. I need to get my content together before I decide. There were some interesting examples of hand made books passed around which I took some pictures of.

    I scanned and printed some of the free photos I got from the museum and stuck them on to my beak book as a test.


    26 Nov
  8. Creativity is anything new

    The creativity talk from Christopher Sharrock gave me lots to think about. Where do my ideas come from? He said everyone is creative from a very young age when baby’s experiment with language and make new words.

    It’s important to find out your personal working method/ environment. When you get a brief, it’s good to re-read and research the subject then step away and have a break from thinking. It’s then when the ideas come, for me it’s on the bus or as I’m going to sleep. Once the ideas are there ask other peoples opinion.

    If that fails these might work- Adapting existing iconic images, using the meduim as the message, having a designers eye, animating objects, using pictures as words (rebus) and words as pictures, putting two together to create a third meaning, joke imagery (debunking), decoration, visual metaphors, invasion of scale/ optical illusions.

    I though a lot of the lecture was common sense but it was good to be able to write down how to be creative and that I should “Think about how I think”.


  9. 05 Nov
  10. Guest lecture- Darren Di Lieto
A web designer who studied in Graphic Design and Illustration. Darren creates websites mainly aimed at promoting and connecting illustrators with each other and clients. He initially set up a blog style site called thelittlechimpsociety to have a forum for illustrators to promote and discuss their work and to get the latest news updates. Later he developed the hireanillustrator website to give people the opportunity of finding paid commissions.

The image above is a submission to the Mail Me Art project where Darren asked illustrators to send decorated envelopes and boxes to him. Hundreds of people replied and an exhibition and book was made of all the work. It’s a great idea and a different way of promoting your illustrations. I wouldn’t mind getting one of those through the post.

Many illustrators decide to create merchandise as well as freelance as an extra income. Selling things like prints, pin badges, clothing and toys using website like etsy or on your personal site e.g n8w and Jon Burgeman.
Having an online presence is essential in getting yourself known. It’s important to let people know you and your work, and using ‘mail blasts’ and postcards is a good way of doing this. Darren explained how companies often forget who you are and it’s good to be persistent. I learned that keeping a back catalogue of work is also important as it could be re-used or manipulated for another job later on.

    Guest lecture- Darren Di Lieto
    A web designer who studied in Graphic Design and Illustration. Darren creates websites mainly aimed at promoting and connecting illustrators with each other and clients. He initially set up a blog style site called thelittlechimpsociety to have a forum for illustrators to promote and discuss their work and to get the latest news updates. Later he developed the hireanillustrator website to give people the opportunity of finding paid commissions.

    The image above is a submission to the Mail Me Art project where Darren asked illustrators to send decorated envelopes and boxes to him. Hundreds of people replied and an exhibition and book was made of all the work. It’s a great idea and a different way of promoting your illustrations. I wouldn’t mind getting one of those through the post.

    Many illustrators decide to create merchandise as well as freelance as an extra income. Selling things like prints, pin badges, clothing and toys using website like etsy or on your personal site e.g n8w and Jon Burgeman.
    Having an online presence is essential in getting yourself known. It’s important to let people know you and your work, and using ‘mail blasts’ and postcards is a good way of doing this. Darren explained how companies often forget who you are and it’s good to be persistent. I learned that keeping a back catalogue of work is also important as it could be re-used or manipulated for another job later on.


  11. 21 Oct

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GEORGE DUNKLEY

BA (Hons) Graphic Design
University of Salford
Graduated 2013
First class honours
YCN Winner 2012/13

I'm a 22 year old tumblr addict from Bury, UK. This is a personal blog of things I've done during my 3 years at university (and then some).

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